KEY-MAN INSURANCE POLICIES VS BUY AND SELL AGREEMENTS: WHICH IS MORE APPROPRIATE FOR YOUR BUSINESS?

KEY-MAN INSURANCE POLICIES VS BUY AND SELL AGREEMENTS: WHICH IS MORE APPROPRIATE FOR YOUR BUSINESS?

INTRODUCTION

There is an important distinction between a key-man insurance policy and a buy and sell agreement. While they are both used in the context of ensuring the ongoing profitability and sustainability of a business in the event of the untimely death, severe disability or critical illness of a key business partner, their underlying purpose is different. We briefly unpack these differences below.

KEY-MAN INSURANCE

The value of a business is largely dependent on the input of key employees or partners in the business. The sudden loss of a key individual may put the business at serious risk. As such, a key person can be seen as someone whose absence (through death, disability or critical illness) will have a material adverse effect on the future of the business. What a key-man insurance policy seeks to do, is to protect the business in the event of the premature death of a key individual or if such key individual becomes disabled or critically ill. Such a policy is taken out and paid for by the company and upon the death, disability or critical illness of the key individual (who may or may not be a shareholder), the policy proceeds are paid to the company (rather than to the deceased estate in the case of a death of the individual). This provides the company with cash flow to enable the business to continue operations while a suitable replacement is found.

BUY AND SELL AGREEMENTS

A buy and sell insurance policy is typically used to fund a buy and sell agreement. The buy and sell agreement itself contains several important provisions to facilitate the orderly transition of ownership of the business, should one of the owners die prematurely, become disabled or critically ill, which provisions may include (amongst others):

  • What events may trigger a buy-out by the remaining shareholders – will it only be the death, disability or critical illness of the shareholder concerned, or will it include other events such as retirement or bankruptcy?
  • What shares each of the remaining shareholders are entitled or required to purchase – all shares or only shares of a specific class?
  • In what proportions the remaining shareholders will purchase the shares – pro rata or in a specified proportion?
  • How the buy and sell agreement will be funded – by way of an insurance policy or other method?
  • How the shares of the company will be valued.

Where a company has numerous shareholders, a buy and sell agreement provides the mechanism to provide for the funds that the remaining shareholders will need to acquire the deceased shareholder’s shares. This has an important bearing on the sustainability of the business as it may not always be a good idea for these shares to be passed on to the heirs – they may not necessarily have the skill set nor the desire to work in the business.

TAX IMPLICATIONS OF KEY-MAN POLICIES

The tax implications relating to the treatment of premiums paid and the proceeds received from a key-man policy are often overlooked. We discuss the various tax consequences briefly below.

Income Tax:

In terms of the Income Tax Act, 58 of 1962 (ITA), a company may be able to claim certain insurance premiums paid on the life of the key-person as a deduction. Whether the premiums could be deducted, will depend on whether the conditions and requirements as set out in the ITA have been met and in each case the particular policy wording will need to be reviewed in order to determine whether it is likely that a deduction will be allowed.

Estate Duty:

Section 3(3)(a) of the Estate Duty Act, Act 45 of 1955 (Estate Duty Act), includes the proceeds from a life insurance policy on the life of the deceased as “deemed property” of the deceased estate, if it meets the requirements of this section, irrespective of who the owner of the policy was or who paid the premiums. However, the full proceeds are not always included in terms of these deeming provisions. The section further provides that where the policy proceeds are not recoverable by the estate, but by the company, and the company also paid the premiums, only the amount by which the proceeds exceeds the total premiums paid plus interest thereon, is deemed to be the property of the deceased estate. However, section 3(3)(a)(ii) of the Estate Duty Act contains an estate duty exemption for these policies, resulting in them not being included as the deemed property of the deceased estate, provided all the requirements listed for the exemption to apply, have been met. If this is the case, no estate duty will be payable on the policy proceeds.

Capital Gains Tax (CGT):

In terms of paragraph 55 of the 8th Schedule to the ITA, the proceeds of key-man policies are exempt from CGT in the following instances:

  • where the person is the original beneficial owner of the policy;
  • where the person, whose life is insured, is or was an employee or director and any premiums paid by the person’s employer were deducted in terms of section 11(w) of the ITA;
  • where the policy is a risk policy with no cash or surrender value;
  • where the policy’s proceeds are exempt from income tax under section 10(1) of the ITA.

TAX IMPLICATIONS OF BUY AND SELL AGREEMENTS

Income Tax:

If the policy to fund a buy and sell agreement meets the requirements of section 11(w) of the ITA, the premiums payable may be deductible and the proceeds may be subject to income tax, again depending on the nature of the receipt.

Estate Duty:

The insurance policy to fund a buy and sell agreement must have been taken out for the purpose of buying out the interest of the deceased person, or a part of the interest – otherwise the policy will not be exempt from the “deemed property” and will be included in the deceased estate.

The deceased must not have paid any of the premiums of the policy. If a deceased has paid premiums on a buy and sell policy, it is likely to be regarded as the deemed property of the deceased and in which case it may not qualify for the exemption referred to earlier.

CGT:

If risk policies are used to fund the buy and sell agreement, the proceeds are exempted from CGT in terms of paragraphs 55(1)(a), (c) and (e) of the 8th Schedule to the ITA.

Any life insurance payments to the original beneficial owners and where no premiums were paid by the deceased, have always been exempted from CGT in terms of the 8th Schedule to the ITA.

If a deceased shareholder cedes his or her policy to a new shareholder, the policy ceded is a 2nd hand policy and historically gave rise to CGT consequences when the ceded benefit is eventually paid out, which is now alleviated by paragraph 55(1)(e) of the 8th Schedule to the ITA, subject to the policies being pure risk policies.

CONCLUSION

Replacement of a key individual or ensuring the orderly transition of ownership of a business (as the case may be) can take time. Although the memorandum of incorporation (MOI) or the shareholders’ agreement of the company may contain provisions on what should happen to the shares on the death or disability of a particular shareholder, they often do not take into account, the practical aspects involved. Additional funding and/or a separate buy and sell agreement is therefore required to ensure that all the necessary requirements and relevant processes are carefully set out and planned for. It’s important to note that, in terms of the Companies Act, 71 of 2008, no other agreement may supersede the shareholders’ agreement or MOI, so the company will need to ensure that if it is a buy and sell agreement they want to enter into, such agreement is properly aligned with the MOI and shareholders’ agreement.

SOURCES:

VEHICLE FINANCE “EXTRA FEE”: STRIP IT OR BILL IT?

VEHICLE FINANCE “EXTRA FEE”: STRIP IT OR BILL IT?

The National Consumer Tribunal (“NCT“) recently came out guns blazing and caused a stir in the motor vehicle industry. The application by Volkswagen Financial Services SA (“VWFS“) for the review and setting aside of a compliance notice previously issued against them by the National Credit Regulator (“NCR“), was dismissed by the NCT during the month of April 2019.

First, some background: the NCR issued compliance notices against VWFS and BMW Financial Services in 2017. In terms of these compliance notices, the NCR held that the “on the road” fees (colloquially termed as “Service & Delivery Charge” or the like) by the respective vehicle financiers constitute prohibited charges in terms of the National Credit Act, 34 of 2005 (“NCA“) and ordered each of these financiers to refund consumers who paid such fees. VWFS subsequently applied to the NCT to review and set aside the compliance notice issued by the NCR against them. The NCT however rejected their application and confirmed the decision taken by the NCR in their compliance notice (in a somewhat amended form, but in principle the same). The NCT ruled that VWFS were to: (i) refund all affected consumers; and (ii) cease adding any such or similar fees on their (vehicle finance) credit agreements as from 10 April 2019.

VWFS have since indicated that they will appeal the decision of the NCT, the effect of which then suspends enforcement of the ruling until the appeal has been finalised by the relevant court. Simply put, VWFS need not to comply with the compliance notice until the matter has been settled by the relevant High Court.

Please follow the link below to access a copy of the relevant NCT ruling:

http://www.thenct.org.za/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Volkswagen-Financial-Services-South-Africa-pty-Ltd-v-National-Credit-Regulator-NCT-94937-2017-5612.pdf

INCENTIVISING EMPLOYEES: PHANTOM SCHEME OR ESOP?

INCENTIVISING EMPLOYEES: PHANTOM SCHEME OR ESOP?

As we receive more requests from entrepreneurs who want to incentivise valued employees in an optimistic effort to either attract top talent, retain top talent or even benefit their business’ BEE status profile, we realised that the motive behind such incentives are not always aligned to the type of incentive instrument that entrepreneurs request. In this blog, we aim to provide you with a basic distinction between two popular incentive instruments, namely the phantom share scheme (“Scheme“) and the employee share ownership plan (“ESOP“) to assist you in electing the best instrument for your valued employees.

PHANTOM SHARE SCHEME

Beneficiaries of a Scheme are awarded notional shares or units (not real shares but rather units giving participant employees the right to certain cash bonuses). The notional shares are linked to the issued shares in the share capital of the company. The Scheme is essentially a cash bonus plan under which the amount of the bonus is measured by reference to the increase in value of the shares in the issued share capital of the company. Such notional shares ordinarily grant the holder the same economic rights and privileges equal to all other actual issued shares in the company on a 1:1 ratio.

Therefore, instead of issuing authorised shares in the share capital of the company, notional shares are created and then awarded to participating employees (with or without vesting conditions). No shares are factually issued or transferred to the employees. Employees do not become actual shareholders of the company. This is illustrated in the fact that  they do not receive rights such as ownership rights in the company; rights to inspect records of the company; rights to attend shareholder meetings, nor voting rights – which would result in less control or decision-making influence from beneficiaries. Employees do however, have the opportunity to receive cash bonuses in the actualisation of certain events, such as when profits are declared by the company or any other “liquidity event”.

A Scheme is an excellent tool for attracting top talent and motivating employees who do not have a particularly long serving history with the company. In this respect, the Scheme allows shareholders to retain complete control and ownership of the company. The flexibility of the Scheme ensures that an employee receives a cash-in-hand benefit without enjoying other shareholders rights.

EMPLOYEE SHARE OWNERSHIP PLAN (ESOP)

An ESOP structure allows participating employees to acquire actual shares in the share capital of the company. By virtue of holding actual shares, such employees will become part owners of the company, they will have voting rights in the company (involving them in decision-making) and they will benefit financially when dividends are declared, as well as during an exit or other liquidity events. An ESOP, as opposed to a Scheme, is potentially an excellent instrument for incentivising long standing employees who have material interests in the growth of the company. Our recommendation is that ESOP shares should only be awarded to trusted individuals as holders acquire much more extensive rights, for example, the right to inspect sensitive company documentation and records.

CONCLUSION

While other complexities may influence your election of setting up and implementing either an ESOP or a Scheme, we recommend that the instrument selected should be guided by each entrepreneur’s true intentions.

Website terms – purpose, importance and consequences

Website terms – purpose, importance and consequences

Nowadays, websites almost always contain policies and terms that govern your use of the site. Sometimes these policies will appear as banners on the site (which you have to “agree” to in order to make them disappear), links in the page footer (like we have on our website) or as a statement along with a tick box saying that you have “read and agree with” the terms (usually when transacting online).

The questions on peoples’ minds are firstly, why do I need all these different sets of terms and, secondly, are these policies binding.

Why do we need all of these terms?

The website terms which we feel are important are browser terms, privacy policies and commercial/transactional terms. Each one of these deals with specific aspects of the website’s use, including, for example, the collection of personal information, social media integration, payment methods and your rights as a user of the website. Below we discuss each policy and its importance. These policies also protect your rights and interests in your website and can allow for you to have a claim in law against people who infringe your rights.

Browser terms

Although browser terms are not a legal requirement, they are useful to ensure that the “web surfer” understands and agrees to certain key points. Browser terms should be used to inform the surfer that:

  1. you, as the website owner, owe them no responsibilities;
  2. they get no rights to any services or IP merely by browsing;
  3. they are required to respect your website and the content thereof; and
  4. you comply with all necessary legal disclosure requirements.

Browser terms are “agreed” to through the surfer continuing to browse the website. These types of agreements are called “web-wrap” agreements. More on this below.

Privacy policies

Privacy policies are essential whenever the website collects or makes use of personal information. Personal information is often collected through cookies as well as when browsers become users of a website by creating an account or by integrating their social media accounts with the website.

The Protection of Personal Information Act 4 of 2013 (“POPI”) sets conditions for the lawful processing of personal information. Included in POPI’s ambit will be the mere storage of personal information when it is collected by cookies. POPI also requires that companies make certain information available to users when they collect their personal information. This can be achieved through a privacy policy. Privacy policies therefore also assist the website owner to comply with legal requirements

Privacy policies usually include the following important aspects:

  1. the use of cookies to collect certain information;
  2. the purposes for the processing of the personal information;
  3. the sharing of personal information by the website owner with certain select third parties;
  4. the storage of personal information, including the security measures taken and whether cross-border storage will occur; and
  5. the user’s rights in relation to his/her personal information and the recourse that he/she has.

Privacy policies are, like browser terms, usually agreed to by browsing, however, a recent trend has been to display the fact that cookies are used as a banner on a website requiring a “click-wrap” agreement to be entered into in order to remove the banner.

Commercial/transactional terms

As the name suggests, the commercial terms become applicable where the website enables users to transact with the website owner through the website. These terms serve as the terms of the contract which you conclude with the user when the user becomes a customer. The important aspects that this policy should govern includes:

  1. a general explanation of the service or product being offered by the website;
  2. the fees that are payable, which may be a once off purchase price or a subscription fee, as well as the fees relating to delivery costs, insurance and VAT;
  3. the terms applicable to returns;
  4. limitation of liability, which will be subject to the Consumer Protection Act 68 of 2008 (if it applies);
  5. the applicability of promotional codes and vouchers; and
  6. acceptable use policies, however, this is more applicable where the website offers a service and not a product.

The Electronic Communications and Transactions Act 25 of 2002 (“ECTA“) requires certain disclosures in terms of section 43 by the website owner when goods or services are offered for sale or hire through an electronic transaction. Some of the disclosures required include:

  1. company name, registration number and contact number;
  2. addresses, including physical, website and e-mail;
  3. a description of the main characteristics of the goods/services offered (which fulfils the requirement of informed consent;
  4. the full price of the goods, including transport costs, taxes and any other and all costs;
  5. the manners of payment accepted, such as EFT, cash on delivery or credit card, as well as alternative manners of payment such as loyalty points;
  6. the time within which delivery will take place;
  7. any terms of agreement, including guarantees, that will apply to the transaction and how those terms may be accessed, stored and reproduced electronically by consumers;
  8. all security procedures and privacy policy in respect of payment, payment information and personal information; and
  9. the rights of the consumer in terms of section 44 of ECTA.

ECTA also requires that the customer must have an opportunity to review the transaction, correct any mistakes and withdraw from the transaction without penalty before finally concluding the transaction. ECTA non-compliance gives the consumer the opportunity to cancel the order and demand a full refund.

Additional requirements are placed on suppliers transacting online regarding payment systems. The payment system used must be sufficiently secure in terms of current accepted technological standards. Failure to comply with these security standards can render the website owner liable for any damages suffered due to the payment system not being adequately secure.

Are these policies binding?

Essentially, yes, website terms will be binding based on the principles of contract law. Website users must be made aware of the terms that apply to their use of the website and you should always ensure that you include wording to the effect that by anyone continuing to use the website they agree to the terms.

To this effect, web-wrap and click-wrap agreements come into play.

Web-wrap agreements

Web-wrap agreements (also referred to as browse-wrap agreements) are used to acknowledge the terms of use of a website by continuing to use the website. The user indicates acceptance of the terms by using the website and does not expressly indicate acceptance of the terms. Such agreements are usually used in browser terms and privacy policies.

Click-wrap agreements

Click-wrap agreements require the user of a website to indicate their agreement with the terms through positive action – usually by clicking “I accept” before proceeding with their activity on the website. These agreements are usually used for more important agreements, such as when installing new software on your computer or when entering into online transactions.

Conclusion

Even though all of these policies may seem excessive, they are worth having. Yes, copying and pasting clauses from other policies will get the job done, but you may leave yourself vulnerable to certain consequences that you haven’t thought about. These consequences may be even worse when it comes to commercial terms. Contact us for a free quote and ensure that your online business is fully protected!

Companies Act, 71 of 2008 Series Part 7:  Distributions – a few important points to consider

Companies Act, 71 of 2008 Series Part 7: Distributions – a few important points to consider

When considering distributions by a company, we most often think of cash dividends, being one form of return on investment for investors. This is something most start-up clients consider being a future event in their life cycle and don’t often give much thought to upfront. We’ve set out a few important points to take into account when considering whether or not a company should declare a distribution.

What is a distribution?

Firstly, it is important to bear in mind that the shareholders of a company only have an expectation (and not a right) to share in that company’s profits during its existence. There is therefore no obligation on a company to declare distributions to its shareholders.

The Companies Act, 71 of 2008, as amended, (“the Act”) provides a very wide definition of a “distribution”, which goes much further than just cash dividends. This definition can be broken up into three categories, namely, the direct or indirect: (i) transfer by the company of money or other property (other than its own shares) to or for the benefit of one or more of its shareholders; (ii) incurrence of a debt or other obligation by the company for the benefit of one or more of its shareholders; and (iii) forgiveness or waiver by the company of a debt or other obligation owed to the company by one or more of its shareholders.

The definition is further extended to include any of the above actions taken in relation to another company in the same group of companies, but specifically excludes any of the above actions taken upon the final liquidation of a company.

The first category in the definition of a “distribution” includes cash dividends, payments by a company to its shareholders instead of capitalisation shares, share buy-backs and any other transfer by a company of money or other property to or for the benefit of one or more of its shareholders, which is otherwise in respect of any of the company’s shares. This last sub-category is intended as a “catch all” provision, making the definition that much wider.

Who can make a distribution and in what circumstances?

Section 46 of the Act sets out the requirements that a company must meet before making a distribution. A company must not make any proposed distribution to its shareholders unless the distribution: (i) has been authorised by the board of directors by way of adopting a resolution (unless such distribution is pursuant to an existing obligation of the company or a court order); (ii) it reasonably appears that the company will satisfy the solvency and liquidity test immediately after completing the proposed distribution; and (iii) the board of the company acknowledges, by way of a resolution, that it has applied the solvency and liquidity test and reasonably concluded that the company will satisfy same immediately after completing the proposed distribution.

For purposes of the solvency and liquidity test, two considerations must be taken into account. Firstly, whether the assets of the company, fairly valued, are equal to or exceed the liabilities of the company, fairly valued (this is often referred to as commercial solvency). Secondly, whether the company will be able to pay its debts as they become due in the ordinary course of business for a period of twelve months after the test is considered, or in the case of a distribution contemplated in the first category of the definition, twelve months following that distribution (this is often termed factual solvency). While the Act attempts to specify what financial information must be taken into account when considering the solvency and liquidity test, the provisions are not that clear, apart from requiring the board to consider accounting records and financial statements satisfying the requirements of the Act and that the board must consider a fair valuation of the company’s assets and liabilities. This leaves a lot of room for interpretation as to what can and should be taken into account when considering the solvency and liquidity test.

An important point to note here is that it is the board of directors of the company that must declare a distribution, and not the shareholders. The company’s Memorandum of Incorporation and/or shareholders’ agreement can place further requirements on the company in relation to declaring distributions, for example, a distribution must also be approved by a special resolution of the shareholders. This does not, however, change the fact that the distribution must first be proposed by the board of directors and ultimately be declared by the board of directors.

What happens if a distribution is authorised by the board but not fully implemented?

When the board of the company has adopted a resolution, acknowledging that it has applied the solvency and liquidity test and reasonably concluded that the company will satisfy the solvency and liquidity test immediately after completing the proposed distribution, then that distribution must be fully carried out. If the distribution has not been completed within 120 business days after the board adopts such resolution, the board must reconsider the solvency and liquidity test with respect to the remaining distribution to be made. Furthermore, the Act states that the company may not proceed with such distribution unless the board adopts a further resolution to that effect.

Directors liability for unlawful distributions

If a director does not follow the requirements for making a distribution and resolves to make such distribution (either at a meeting or by round robin resolution) despite knowing that the requirements have not been met, then that director can be held personally liable for any loss, damages or costs sustained by the company as a direct or indirect consequence of the director failing to vote against the making of that distribution.

There are, however, limitations placed on a director’s potential liability, in that such liability only arises if: (i) immediately after making all of the distribution (no liability can arise for partial implementation), the company does not satisfy the solvency and liquidity test; and (ii) it was unreasonable at the time of the resolution to come to the conclusion that the company would satisfy the solvency and liquidity test after making the relevant distribution.

A director who has reason to think that a claim may be brought against him (other than for wilful misconduct or wilful breach of trust), may apply to court for relief. The court may grant relief to the director if he has acted honestly and reasonably or, having regard to the circumstances, it would be fair to excuse the director.

There is a limit on the amount that a director can be held liable for in relation to not meeting the requirements of a distribution – section 77(4)(b) provides that such amount will not exceed, in aggregate, the difference between the amount by which the value of the distribution exceeded the amount that could have been distributed without causing the company to fail to satisfy the solvency and liquidity test and the amount (if any) recovered by the company from persons to whom the distribution was made.

Conclusion

Distributions by a company of its assets to its shareholders, whether in the form of cash or otherwise, are carefully regulated by the Act. This is clearly to protect the interests of creditors and minority shareholders of the company. You will also have noticed that the Act does not deal separately with the different types of distributions and includes a wide variety of transactions which will be regarded as a distribution under the Act. We trust that the issues highlighted above will give you some insight and guidance on this topic. If you would like to discuss any of these topics in more detail, please feel free to contact our commercial department and we will gladly assist.

If you would like to discuss any of these topics in more detail, please feel free to contact our commercial department and we will gladly assist.